Subjects

Click below to download the Subjects Overview

Animal Care

Exam Board:
Edexcel

Staff:
Mrs S. Knowles

Introduction:

This course has been added to see if students are interested in the studying for a Level 2 technical qualification in Animal Care. If numbers are not right for the course it will not run so it is important to ensure you have a clear reserve preference. This course will look at various subjects dealing with the welfare of animals and will directly to the level 3 course at colleges like Capel Manor in Enfield.

What will I learn?
  • Animal welfare: How to ensure an animal is well looked after and what to do if it is not
  • Animal handling: The best and safest way to handle animals to ensure you and the animal itself is not put at risk
  • Diseases: The most common disease to infect animals and how to spot them
  • Animal habitats: The requirements that common animals need to stay healthy and how to spot when they are not up to scratch
  • Animal behaviour: How to spot an animal that is happy and healthy and how to spot an animal that is not behaviour naturally
  • Animal habitats: How to set up animal habitats to ensure all of their specific needs are met
How will I be assessed?

You will complete 3 units which are externally set but internally marked. The final unit is externally set and externally marked and is designed to test students understanding in a fixed scenario.

How are you assessed?

There is one 1 hour assessment sat in the summer term that will assess some of the content you will be studying in class. The rest of the content will be assessed by your class teacher. This will be in the form of various pieces of coursework that you will have to prepare and submit such as power point presentations, leaflets, posters, videos and photographs showing evidence of certain skills such as animal handling.

Very Important Course Requirements

Please note that due to the nature of this course and the access requirements to animals, it is essential that you either have a pet yourself or have access to one that you can interact with as part of your coursework . You will need to demonstrate that you are able to interact with a variety of animals so owning cats, dogs, rabbits, fish, lizards etc. is ideal (actually the more you have the better). Any students that ride a horse and that are able to access stables will also stand well for this course, especially if they can muck out. Please be aware that if you have any allergies to animals we will need to be aware of these prior to starting the course.

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

This course will give you a fantastic foundation in animal care if you wanted to study it further at college or sixth form.
If you are interested in careers such as dog walking, animal science, veterinary science, veterinary nurse, pet sitting or working in environments such as farm or zoological societies or with horses, this course will provide you with the first steps. You will also have a grounding in working with animals in industries like; security, customs and exercise, police dog handler etc. The use of animals as tools is very important and so an understanding of their welfare is key to good working relationships for both animal and handler.

Art

Exam Board:
Edexcel (Art & Design)

Staff:
Mrs Bloom

Introduction:

Through this course you’ll develop transferable skills, such as problem solving, communication and critical thinking skills, which will prepare you for further study or the world of work, regardless of the subjects or career you wish to pursue.

In an increasingly digital world we’re communicating more with images and less with words. Images are superseding words as our primary form of communication. On Instagram alone, 20 billion photos have been uploaded since 2010. Many of us employ visual language, often without realizing it. Being fluent in the language of images gives us an advantage at school, at work, and at home. Leading researchers, educators, museum professionals, filmmakers, and artists believe that being fluent in visual language can improve one’s creativity, critical thinking, educational achievement, empathy towards others and the ability to decipher technology.

What will I learn?

In year 10 you will produce a sketchbook of artwork that focuses on the themes ‘natural forms vs man made’ and ‘people and faces’. You will produce a final outcome for each unit, the ‘natural forms vs man made’ unit will be a two dimensional painting and the ‘people and faces’ will be a three dimensional sculpture. This sculpture is to be designed for London’s ‘Fourth Plinth’ and you will investigate other artists who have exhibited their work there.

In year 11 you will work on the exam paper from the previous year. In this unit you will look at the work of artists who will inform your own personal development of a final piece.

In January the exam board will release the new title and this students will then work on a new body of work relating to the given topic. This will culminate in a 10 hour exam in which you will produce your final outcome.

 

How will I be assessed?
Component 1: Personal Portfolio Component 2: Externally Set Assignment
This component is worth 60% of your GCSE. You will produce a portfolio of work including a minimum of 3 final pieces. One will be two dimensional and one will be three dimensional. The units of work covered in this section are; ‘natural forms vs man made’, ‘sculpture: people and faces’ and the externally set exam title from the previous year.

This component is worth 40% of your GCSE. You will produce preparatory studies and a personal outcome based on the theme set by Edexcel.

Each composed is assessed out of 72 marks. There are four assessment objectives. Your teacher will mark the work and then it will be moderated by the
exam board.

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

On completion of your GCSE Art course you could progress onto further education. Courses at Level 3 include: AS/A Level Art and Design, BTEC Nationals in Art and Design and Diplomas/Certificates in Creative Media

If you choose to look for an apprenticeship, you will have a portfolio of work that will evidence your ability to pursue a two-year GCSE course in Art and Design, covering different assignments and producing a range of work. There are many possible career routes that you may choose to follow e.g.: Digital/Multi-Media roles; Graphic Design; Advertising Director; Fine Art; Architect; Arts Administrator; Fashion and many more.

Business Studies

Exam Board:
Edexcel Level 1/2 GCSE

Staff:
Ms J Robins

Introduction:

If you are a keen communicator, can ‘think on your feet’, and have the passion and desire to succeed, then this course is for you. Business Studies is suited to those of you who are diligent about their work and have the ability to look at business aspects from all angles.

You must be able to recognise the advantages and disadvantages of key business aspects and apply them to two examinations at the end of Year 11.

What will I learn?

Are you interested in setting up and establishing your own business? Where better to start than with a GCSE in Business Studies. You will be learning about the modern and evolving business environment where you will be exploring how and why businesses start, and issues and decisions that allow businesses to grow.

This course focuses on the use of business strategies that will be useful for all aspects of your future and is taught using two themes:

Theme 1:
Enterprise and Entrepreneurship
Spotting a Business Opportunity
Putting a Business idea into Practice
Making a Business Effective
External influences
Theme 2:
Growing the business
Making Marketing Decisions
Making Operational Decisions
Makign Financial Decisions
Making Human Resources Decisions
How will I be assessed?

The Business Studies content is assessed in two examination papers at the end of Year 11:

Theme 1: Investigating a Small Business
(Paper Code: 1BS0/01)
Theme 2: Building a Business
(Paper Code: 1BS0/02)
Externally Assessed Externally Assessed
1 hr 30 minutes Written Paper
Edexcel Set and Marked
1 hr 30 minutes Written Paper
Edexcel Set and Marked
90 marks – 50% of the qualification 90 marks – 50% of the qualification

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

Students can enrol onto BTEC National Certificate/Diploma qualifications in Business Studies or NVQ’s and AS/A Level Business Studies.

As Business Studies is a very broad and diverse subject, the preferences available for jobs are limitless. Students can, with further training, run and own their own business, become an entrepreneur or simply use their business studies skills in any job they pursue.

Creative iMedia

Exam Board:
OCR Cambridge Nationals

Staff:
Ms J Robins

Introduction:

This vocational qualification takes an engaging, practical and inspiring approach to learning and assessment. It will help you with developing a range of specific and transferable skills in research, planning, review, working collaboratively, and communicating creative concepts. The practical nature of this qualification is relevant to how you currently use technology in a creative way.

What will I study? (Topics/Modules, etc)

Mandatory Units

  • Pre-Production Skills – This unit gives you the opportunity to learn how to plan pre-production effectively. You will learn how to interpret client requirements and review pre-production briefs which will in turn help in the development of your own media products created in additional units.
  • Creating Digital Graphics – This unit will allow you to understand the part digital graphics play in most digital products. It is a mandatory unit as it underpins the content within the optional units. You will learn about the basics of digital graphics editing and creation within the media sector and will be required to create a digital graphic based on a given client brief.

Optional Units

  • Creating a Digital Animation – You will be able to learn about animation and how it is used in a range of sectors. You will plan and create a digital animation using a range of techniques which will fulfil requirements outlined in a given client brief.
  • Creating a Digital Sound Sequence – This unit will allow you the opportunity of understanding the role audio plays in a wide range of digital products. You will be expected to explore concepts related to using audio products and in turn plan and design an audio sequence which meets a specified client brief.
Assessment

R081: Pre-Production Skills
(Mandatory Unit)

R082: Creating Digital Graphics
(Mandatory Unit)

R086: Creating a Digital Animation

R088: Creating a Digital Sound Sequence

Externally Assessed Internally Assessed Internally Assessed Internally Assessed
1 hr 15 minutes Written
Paper OCR Set and Marked
Centre Assessed Task
OCR Moderated
Centre Assessed Task
OCR Moderated
Centre Assessed Task
OCR Moderated
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

This course is suited to those pupils who intend to continue with education post 16 on a course or apprenticeship with a computing or media component, as well as for those who wish to pursue a career within computing or media beyond A level or university. As a result of the academic nature of the course pupils wishing to take the preference may be required to have attained high levels in one or more core subjects.

Job prospects for students that decide to take Creative iMedia are very wide spread. As well as computing related jobs other opportunities are in film, gaming, animation, web development, IT.

Computer Science

Exam Board:
OCR

Staff:
Ms J Robins

Introduction:

Computing is of enormous importance to the economy, and the role of Computer Science as a discipline itself and as an ‘underpinning’ subject across science and engineering is growing rapidly. Computer technology continues to advance rapidly and the way that technology is consumed has also been changing at a fast rate over recent years. The growth in the use of mobile devices and web related technologies has exploded resulting in new challenges for employers and employees. Students considering studying Computer Science should be analytical thinkers who can find solutions to computer-based problems. You need to be logical in your thinking and have good mathematical skills. You also need to be able to work independently as there is a controlled assessment.

What will I study?

The specification has been designed around the key elements covered at key stage 3. You will cover contents such as systems architecture, memory and security. It also covers computational thinking, algorithms and programming. The course consists of new learning which will stretch the students thinking to allow them to think about the ethical, legal, cultural, and environmental concerns as well as the CPU, networks and systems software.

The controlled assessments allows you to develop your programming and analytical skills. You will be analysing, designing and developing solutions to meet particular requirements. You will also learn the importance of testing and evaluating programs, and how these skills are used in industry.

Assessment
Component 1: Computer Systems Component 2: Computational Thinking, Algo-rithms, and Programming Programming Project
Externally Assessed Externally Assessed Formal Requirement
1 hr 30 minutes Written Paper
OCR Set and Marked
1 hr 30 minutes Written Paper
OCR Set and Marked
Centre Assessed Task
80 marks – 50% of total GCSE 80 marks – 50% of total GCSE 20 timetabled hours
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

This course is suited to those pupils who intend to continue with education post 16 on a course or apprenticeship with a Computer Science component, as well as for those who wish to pursue a career within computing beyond A-level or University. Because of the academic nature of the course, pupils wishing to take the option may be required to have attained high levels in one or more core subjects especially Mathematics.

Job prospects for students that decide to take GCSE Computer Science are very wide spread. Students can specialise in specific Computing related jobs such as a Network Manager, Help Desk Coordinator, Web Designer, or simply use their computing skills in their chosen field.

English Language and English Literature

 xam Board:
AQA GCSE in English Language
AQA GCSE in English Literature

Staff: Ms R Heather

Introduction:

This is a two year course following the new AQA specification for both English Language and English Literature. By the end of the course you will be entered for exams in both subjects: giving you two separate GCSE qualifications. The new specification means that coursework and controlled assessment have now been replaced with four end of course exams. The exams will be closed book and based on extracts that students have studied.

What will I learn?

English Language GCSE: You will study a range of fiction and non-fiction texts that will allow you to: explore writers’ viewpoints and perspectives through reading and writing; and explore creative reading and writing under exam conditions. You will also study a Spoken Language unit of work which does not count towards your final grade. For this unit you will develop your presentation and questioning skills.

English Literature GCSE: You will explore British Literary Heritage writers such as: Shakespeare, Bronte, Doyle, and Austin. You will be required to have a thorough knowledge of the authors and their works of writing. You will have to analyse language for meaning, the themes of the text, and how the context of the time period affected the work. You will also explore modern authors and poets where you will have to demonstrate comparison skills and tackle unseen literature texts.

 

How will I be assessed?
English Language
Paper 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing
+
Paper 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives
+
Non–examination Assessment: Spoken Language

What’s assessed:
Section A: Reading
1 literature fiction text

Section B: Writing
Descriptive or narrative writing

What’s assessed:
Section A: Reading
1non-fiction text and 1 literary non-fiction text

Section B: Writing
Writing to a viewpoint

What’s assessed:
(A07-A09)
Presenting
Responding to questions and feedback
Use of Standard English
Assessed
Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
80 marks – 50% of GCSE
Assessed
Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
80 marks – 50% of GCSE
Assessed
Teacher set throughout course
Marked by teacher
Separate endorsement (0% weighting of GCSE)

Questions:
Reading (40 marks) (25%) – one single text
1 short form question (1×4 marks)
2 longer form questions (2×8 marks)
1 extended question (1×20 marks)

Writing (40 marks) (25%)
1 extended writing question (24 marks for content, 16 marks for technical accuracy)

Questions:
Reading (40 marks) (25%) – two linked texts
1 short form question (1×4 marks)
2 longer form questions (1×8, 1×12 marks)
1 extended question (1×16 marks)

Writing (40 marks) (25%)
1 extended writing question (24 marks for content, 16 marks for technical accuracy)

 

English Language & Literature
Paper 1: Shakespeare and the 19th-century
novel
+
Paper 2: Modern texts and poetry
What’s assessed:
Shakespeare
The 19th-century novel
What’s assessed:
Modern texts
Poetry
Unseen poetry
Assessed
Written exam: 1 hour 45 minutes
64 marks – 40% of GCSE
Assessed
Written exam: 2 hours 15 minutes
96 marks – 60% of GCSE

Questions:
Section A: Shakespeare – you will answer one question on your play of preference. You will be required to write in detail about an extract from the play and then to write about the play as a whole.

Section B: The 19th Century Novel – you will answer one question on a novel of your preference. You will be required to write in detail about an extract from the novel and then to write about the novel as a whole.

Questions:
Section A: Modern Texts – you will answer one essay question from a preference of two on your studied modern prose or drama text.

Section B: Poetry – you will answer one comparative question on one named poem printed on the paper and one other poem from your chosen anthology cluster.

Section C: Unseen Poetry – you will answer one question on one unseen poem and one question comparing this poem with a second unseen poem.

Both English GCSE courses are now 100% exam based. There are no coursework or controlled assessment requirements.

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?
Both the English Language and Literature GCSE courses are a core requirement for most college courses at grade 4 or above, with many local sixth forms looking for a 5/6 grade.

Through reading, writing and speaking and listening, English Language and English Literature both build life skills that enable you to communicate in the world you live in.

Future preferences with these subjects could include: journalism, politics, teaching, medicine, law, human resources, writing.

Geography

Exam Board:
Edexcel

Staff:
Mrs R Rundle

Introduction:

GCSE Geography explores many headline global issues highlighted in the media today and examines ways of managing our planet without harming the environment. The course will give you the chance to get to grips with some of the big questions which affect our world and understand the social, economic and physical forces and processes which shape and change our world. The emphasis is on problem solving and enquiry throughout the GCSE, giving you the skills that employers want and preparing you for employment and further education.

If you enjoy:

  • learning more about the world we live in
  • developing skills that will help you in other areas, such as IT and research
  • completing some of your own practical work away from the classroom
  • working in a team with other students
  • learning through investigating and doing, as well as listening and reading

Then this GCSE Geography course is the ideal subject for you.

What will I learn?

Theme 1: Living with the physical environment. This unit will give you a sound understanding of important physical processes such as geological processes, ecosystems, the atmosphere and climate, and the hydrological cycle. These topics are interlinked and although you may study them separately the unit is designed to show you how physical geography combines to create a `life support system’ for the planet. Topics include: natural hazards, tectonic hazards, weather hazards, climate change, ecosystems, tropical rainforests, hot deserts, UK physical landscapes, coastal landscapes in Britain.

Theme 2: Challenges of the human environment. This unit focuses on human geography. In a similar way to Unit 1, it links together to build an overall understanding of human geography. You will study how populations grow and change, where people live and work, and how they exploit and use resources. Topics include: urban issues and challenges, the economic world, water and the challenge of resource management.

How will I be assessed?
Paper 1: Living with the physical environment (35% of the total GCSE) Paper 2: Challenges in the human environment (35% of the total GCSE) Paper 3: Geographical applications (30% of the total GCSE)
The challenges of natural hazards, the living world, the physical landscapes in the UK and general geographical skills through questions.
1 hour 30 minutes
Urban issues and challenges, the changing economic world, the challenge of resource management and general geographical skills through questions.
1 hour 30 minutes
Issue evaluation, field work and general geographical skills.
1 hour 15 minutes
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

Employers and universities value the broad range of transferable skills that GCSE Geography delivers. It fits neatly with science, arts and humanities, and geographers also tend to have very good IT skills.

A GCSE in Geography is excellent preparation for AS/A level in Geography and careers in planning, resource and countryside management, tourism and recreation, and environmental management and development. Many geographers also move into general management careers or branch out into journalism.

Health & Social Care

Exam Board:
NCFE V-Cert

Staff:
Mrs R. Glover

Introduction:

This course will enable learners to develop knowledge, understanding and skills in relation the health and social care sector . The qualification will cover an introduction to the health and social care sector ,professional practice and the health and social care practitioner and human growth and development through the life stages. This course is NOT aimed at girls only and we welcome the boys on this course equally.

 

What will I learn?
  • job roles of health and social care practitioners
  • access/referral procedures
  • ever-changing care needs
  • formal and informal care provision
  • regulation and inspection.
  • responsibilities, skills, behaviours and attributes of health and social care practitioners
  • professional practice
  • professional development
  • legal frameworks, values and guidance
  • components of person-centred practice
  • stages of development from conception to birth
  • potential effects on development of pre-conception experiences, pre-birth experiences and
    during birth experiences
  • life stages: – infancy – childhood – adolescence – early, middle and late adulthood
  • holistic development
  • theoretical perspectives factors impacting on human growth and development
  • transition and significant life events across life stages
  • the role of care planning in relation to meeting individual needs and promoting well-being.
How will I be assessed?

You will complete 3 units which are externally set but internally marked. The final unit is externally set and externally marked and is designed to test students understanding in a fixed scenario.

You will be awarded a Distinction, Merit or Pass.

Unit 1
Unit 1
Unit 1
Unit 1
Introduction into the Health Care and Social Care System Professional practice and the health and social care practitioner Human growth and development through the life stages The Scenario Question (External Exam)
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

While most students may decide to look to go into the NHS, private health care, social services or working with children, this is not the limit of this qualification. The qualification will allow future parents an understanding of the development of their own children both on a physical and emotional level. This course is ideal for students who may in the future look to do level 3 in Health and Social Care and will put them at an advantage to many other students who start this course in college without doing the level 2 course first.

History

Exam Board:
Edexcel (B)

Staff:
Mrs H Piper

Introduction:

The results of the past are all around us; technology, human rights, laws and society. In our GCSE History course, you discover why we live in the world we do; why our lives have improved through time (medicine and treatment) and how sometimes our lives become more difficult (war and political extremism). You will examine pictures, diaries, videos and personal testimonies along with historians views in order to interpret the past

If you enjoy or are interested in:

  • studying history through the eyes of people who lived through the period
  • finding out about how people’s lives have changed and how people in the past may have thought differently from us
  • debating and understanding why there are sometimes different, but equally valid, points of view on the same subject

Then GCSE History is the ideal subject for you.

What will I learn?

In Year 10:
Paper 2 (A): A period study of Superpower relations and Cold War from 1941-1991
Paper 2(B): A depth study of late Anglo-Saxon and early Norman England from 1066-1086.
Paper 3: A modern depth study of German History from 1918-1939, focusing on the rise of the Nazi Party.

In Year 11:
Paper 1: A thematic study of crime and punishment through time, 1000AD to the present day.

How will I be assessed?

You will take 3 exam papers at the end of Year 11. Paper 1 is 30% of the mark and will be sat for 1 hour 15 minutes. Paper 2 makes up 40% of the total award and is 1 hour 45 minutes and Paper 3 is1 hour 20 minutes and makes up the final 30%.

Paper 1 Paper 2 Paper 3
Thematic Study and Historical Environment Study. (30%) Period Study and British Depth Study. (40%) Modern Depth Study
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

Apart from enjoying the course and being a lot more aware of the world around you, GCSE History is a solid basis for many AS/A level subjects. Students who have done well in History often study higher qualifications in subjects such as Politics, Law, Economics, and Sociology. History also goes well with subjects such as English and languages.

Many people working in law and accountancy have studied History because of the skills that can be developed in reasoning and arguing your point. There are also many areas more directly related to History, such as travel and tourism, museums, the media industry, libraries, government research, academic research and, of course, History teaching.

Mathematics

Exam Board:
Edexcel

Staff: Mr J Medforth

Introduction:

The new Mathematics GCSE places emphasis on problem-solving, functionality and mathematical thinking. Students will be expected to demonstrate their skills by applying mathematics to solve problems, prove theories and to rationalise. Many problems focus on real life scenarios, for instance, a typical question may involve decorating a room or designing a garden; or perhaps paying bills or sorting out rotas for shop staff.

Questions will also require students to be able to communicate the mathematics they have applied – a requirement called Quality of Written Communication. This may involve, for example, giving a reason for an answer, correctly setting out proof or accurately marking up a statistical diagram.

The GCSE has double weighting and is assessed at the end of the course in 3 examinations.

The subject content for the course is categorised into the following six areas:
1. Number
2. Algebra
3. Ratio, proportion and rates of change
4. Geometry and measures
5. Probability
6. Statistics

What will I learn?

This course builds on the content, knowledge and skills developed at Key Stage 3. There are a number of resources available to help you and increase your chances of attaining the best grade possible.

We can provide you with:
MathsWatch Login (approx. 150 graded mini video clips )
Revision Guide & Workbook
Doddle resources
Exam questions
Lunchtime Drop-In sessions
After school revision & help sessions
GCSE Mathematics has a Foundation tier (grades 1– 5) and a Higher tier (grades 4 – 9).

How will I be assessed?

Students must take three question papers, all at the same tier. The course is 100% assessed
through examination. Each paper is worth one third of the marks towards the final grade.
The exams cover a mix of question styles, from short, single-mark questions to multi-step
problems. The mathematical demand increases as a student progresses through the paper.

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

GCSE Mathematics prepares students for advanced level courses such as AS/A level in Mathematics, Statistics, Further Mathematics or Decision Mathematics.
Once you have achieved this qualification, after further training, your career path could lead you into most jobs from Accountant, Teacher in any subject, Economist, Electrician, Engineer, Plumber, Scientist, etc.
Alternately you could also go straight into employment and on average your earnings would be higher than a person who does not achieve appropriate understanding of Mathematics.

 

Music

Exam Board:
OCR

Staff:
Mrs D Russel

Introduction:

Have you ever lived a day without music? TV adverts, radio, exercise classes, movies: music is always there. GCSE Music is an opportunity for you to discover a range of familiar and more unusual musical styles in a fun and practical way. The course is also designed to teach you how to perform and compose to a high standard so that you can enjoy making music after leaving school. Students who study GCSE Music may choose to progress further by studying at A Level/Degree or by attending music college, but it’s also an excellent GCSE preference for those who just want a bit of variety and have a passion for music. Playing an instrument can improve your confidence, teamwork, alertness, selfdiscipline, attention to detail, and even your memory and organisational skills.

Note: To achieve a high grade in music, you will need to play an instrument confidently and musically. Ask Mrs Russell for more information or advice on this.

If you are considering taking this preference, please speak to Mrs Russel first.

What will I learn?

  • Musical styles (areas of study) in GCSE Music*
  • My Music (a study of your instrument)
  • The Concerto Through Time (Baroque Solo Concerto, Baroque Concerto Grosso, Classical Concerto,
    Romantic Concerto.)
  • Rhythms of the World (Indian Classical Music and traditional Punjabi Bhangra, Traditional Eastern Mediterranean and Arabic folk rhythms: Greek, Palestinian and Israeli music, Traditional African drumming, Calypso and Samba)
  • Film Music (film scores, Western Classical music in films, video game soundtracks)
  • Conventions of Pop (Rock ‘n’ Roll of the 1950s & 1960s, rock anthems of the 1970s & 1980s, pop ballads of the 1970s, 1980s & 1990s, solo artists from 1990 to the present day)

* These musical styles will feature in a listening exam at the end of Year 11 and will also influence at least one of your compositions.

How will I be assessed?

Integrated Task: Performance 1 and Composition 1 (worth 30%)

Practical Portfolio: Performance 2 (group performance) & Composition 2 (worth 30%) Listening Exam (worth 40%).

Controlled Assessments: You will record 2 performances and 2 compositions by the end of Year 11.

Modern Foreign Language

Exam Board:
AQA

Staff:
Mrs S Barker Smith

Introduction:

MFL makes up part of the English Baccalaureate and is seen as an important subject to take. Dealing with another culture enables people to gain a more profound understanding of their own culture. Creativity is increased with the study of foreign languages. Graduates often cite foreign language courses as some of the most valuable courses in college because of the communication skills developed in the process.

You should follow this course if:

  • You enjoy learning French or German
  • You would like to work or travel abroad
    • Language skills are important for many companies and other organisations as well as being regarded as a highly valuable qualification by colleges and universities
    • Universities have started to make a language at GCSE a requirement for admission to all its courses and others are expected to do the same
What will I learn?

You will cover the following modules:

  • Identity and culture
  • Local area, holiday and travel
  • School
  • Future aspirations, study and work
  • International and global dimension
How will I be assessed?

Paper 1 Listening and understanding in French/German 25%
Paper 2 Speaking 25%
Paper 3 Reading and understanding in French/German 25%
Paper 4 Writing in French/German 25%

Moral, Social and Well-being Education (RSE & PSHE)

You will participate in these lessons during Period 1 on Mondays and Wednesdays to Fridays, as well as learning about these themes during assemblies. This includes concepts of British values such as tolerance, living in a free, democratic society, and the rule of law, sex, relationships, finances, taxes, social media, e-safety to name a few of the subject areas.

Some of this is delivered by external agencies and groups to ensure clear subject knowledge.

Topics studied include

  • Our media: free and fair?
  • Internet safety
  • Britain as a diverse society
  • How we uphold our values as a society
  • Taking care of our health (including a look at the NHS)
  • Our emotional and mental well-being, including relationships
  • Finance
  • Future employment prospects, including preparing a CV for work experience at the end of Year 10

NCFE V - Cert in Health & Fitness

Exam Board:
NCFE Technical award in Health and Fitness

Staff:
Mr Andrew, Mr Lockett & Miss Clark

Introduction:

This course is for you if you think you would enjoy studying about all aspects of Health and Fitness, either in terms of your own or in terms of the potential to give advice to other people about theirs.

What will I learn?

 The course is made up of 2 units, one of which is externally assessed with an examination. The other is coursework based and is internally assessed by the class teacher and then moderated by the NCFE exam board.

The course is broken up into different learning outcomes shown below.

How will I be assessed?

Externally: 1 exam lasting 1hour and 30 minutes (2 attempts)

Internally: Synoptic project (2 attempts)

Unit 1

(Exam40%)

Unit 2

(Synoptic project-60%)

Learning outcome 1:
Structure and functions of body systems.
Learning outcome 2:
Effects of Health and Fitness Activities on the Body
Learning outcome 3:
Health and Fitness and the components of fitness
Learning outcome 4:
Principles of training
Preparing and planning for health and fitness
  • Skeletal System
  • Muscular System
  • Respiratory System
  • Cardiovascular System
  • Energy Systems
  • Short-term effects of health and fitness activities
  • Long-term effects of health and fitness activities
  • Health and Fitness
  • Components of fitness
  • Health– related fitness
  • Skill– related fitness
  • Principles of training
  • Principles of FITT
  • Lifestyle factors
  • Fitness testing
  • Training Methods
  • Optimising a Health and Fitness Programme
  • Analysis and goal setting
  • Structure of H&F Programme

NCFE V - Cert in Food & Cookery

Exam Board:
NCFE V-Cert

Staff:
Mrs R. Glover

Introduction:

This course is for you if you think you would enjoy studying about all aspects
of Health and Fitness, either in terms of your own or in terms of the potential to give advice
to other people about theirs.

What will I learn?

You should have an interest in all aspects of food, and not just eating it:

  • Where it is sourced
  • Why it is important to have a healthy diet
  • The link between food and culture
  • The different nutritional needs for different individuals
  • How food is prepared, presented, marketed and sold Health and safety aspects of food
How will I be assessed?

There are 4 units, 3 of which are assessed by your teacher but then moderated by the exam board
(NCFE). The fourth is an external exam: You will be awarded a Distinction, Merit or Pass

 

Unit 1
Unit 2
Unit 3
Unit 4
Preparing to cook Understanding food Exploring balanced diets (Externally assessed) Planning and producing dishes in response to a brief
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

Students can proceed to study a variety of food and nutrition related courses at college. The career opportunities related to this course are limitless…….. Chef Catering manager Catering at events, festivals and corporate functions Food hygiene Health and safety in the catering field Nutritionist Researching and preparing diets for people with specific needs, such as the elderly and the very young Food sales Working for large supermarket chains

Physical Education - Core

All students participate in 2 hours of compulsory Physical Education over the 2 week timetable, where you will be given the opportunity to use skills and techniques in larger and more challenging contexts involving more participants and requiring increasingly complex tactics and strategies. You will be able to use skills and techniques within demanding sporting scenarios that allow you to demonstrate accuracy, precision, control and originality, building upon what you have learnt in Years 7 to 9.

Activities are often chosen by you for a half term period, or you will take part in ‘Sports Education’ which forms the basis of many lessons. This gives you the opportunity to perform in competitive situations and take on different roles in sport and exercise that interest you.

You will not be given a formal grade for Core PE, but instead, are marked on your participation and attitude to learning.

Physical Education - GCSE

Exam Board:
Edexcel

Staff:
Mr Andrew

Introduction:

GCSE PE enables you to become increasingly physically competent through being actively engaged in a range of physical activities and to become increasingly effective in your performance within different roles such as player/participant, leader and official. The course builds on the knowledge, understanding and skills established in Key Stage 3 Physical Education.

The course enables you to develop your ability to engage independently and successfully in different types of physical activity, and to develop and maintain your involvement in physical activity as part of a healthy, active lifestyle.

This course should be followed if you enjoy: sport and recreation, developing knowledge and understanding through practical involvement, learning about the benefits of sport and exercise, improving your own performance in a range of sports roles, or you are considering a sports-related career or an A/AS level education course.

What will I learn?

The course consists of two externally examined papers (theory) and two non-examined components (practical and PEP).

Component 1: Fitness and Body Systems consists of: Applied Anatomy and Physiology; Movement Analysis; Physical Training and the use of data.

Component 2: Health and Performance consists of; Health, Fitness and Wellbeing; Sport Psychology; Socio-cultural Influences and the use of data.

Component 3: Practical performance whereby students will be assessed in their skills during individual and team activities and their general performance in skills. Students must complete three physical
activities – one as a team player, one as an individual and a free choice.

Component 4: Personal Exercise Programme (PEP): Students will have to plan, carry out, monitor and
evaluate a training programme. Course prerequisites: It is desirable that students should be taking part and/or competing in at least 1 sport either at extra-curricular level or in a club outside of school.

How will

Component 1 Component 2 Component 3 Component 4
This is a written examination (1hr 45mins) and is out of a possible 90 marks, worth 36% of the qualification. This is a written examination (1hr 15mins) and is out of a possible 70 marks, worth 24% of the qualification This is a non-examined assessment: internally marked and externally
moderated. It is worth 30% of the qualification and is out of a possible 105 marks (35 marks per sport).
This is a non-examined assessment: internally marked and externally moderated. It is worth 10% of the qualification and a possible 20 marks.
Papers will be taken in the May/June of Year 11. Can be assessed at any point during the course
What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

GCSE PE is an ideal preparation for further study, such as AS/A levels, BTEC National courses and NVQ’s in PE and Health and Fitness. The course is particularly useful if you wish to pursue a career as a: PE Teacher; Sports Coach; Fitness Instructor/Personal Trainer; Youth Worker; Join the armed forces; Instructor for Outdoor Education; Physiotherapist; Air Cabin Crew; Events manager; Professional sports player; working in a leisure centre; Lifeguard.

Religious Studies

Exam Board:
AQA

Staff:
Miss L Walker

Introduction:

In this course you will examine the beliefs and practices of both Christianity and Buddhism, two religions that come from very different cultures but have a great deal in common. You will investigate the range of beliefs Christians and Buddhists have and will be asked to think critically about the validity of people’s beliefs and actions.

You will focus on skills such as interpreting and evaluating pieces of information, communicating and applying knowledge, and solving problems. You will also have an opportunity to develop your debating skills.

This course is absolutely not about making you “religious’” it is about enabling you to think for yourself about religious and moral issues. What do you believe is right and wrong? How do you think people should behave? Does evil exist? How should
criminals be punished? You will discuss and debate the events you see in the media, and
look at the different relationships and groups in society.

It is about you, your view of religion and the issues you will face when you leave school and go into the multi-ethnic, multi-faith society which is the UK. If you want to: learn about other people’s beliefs, the nature of the society you live in and the big issues in life which generate debate. gain an understanding of what causes prejudice, hatred and violence in our world. have the
opportunity to explore religious and moral beliefs in a safe and questioning environment.

Then GCSE Religious Studies is the course for you.

What will I Learn?
Component One (50%) Component Two (50%)

The beliefs, teachings and practices of two religions,

  • Christianity
  • Buddhism

Four of the following themes ,

  • Theme A – Relationships and families
  • Theme B – Religion and Life Theme C – The existence of God
    and revelation
  • Theme D – Religion Peace and Conflict
  • Theme E – Religion, Crime and Punishment
  • Theme F – Religion, Human Rights and social
How will I be assessed?

Two 1 hour 45 minute exams – one for each component.

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

Religious studies is a traditional and well recognised qualification which links to many different careers.

The course is an excellent basis for moving on to an AS/A Level in the philosophy and sociology areas of study.

It could also take you towards a number of careers, including working in the law, the police, in advertising or as a Counsellor, Social Worker, Nurse, Youth Worker, Teacher or Philosopher.

Further to that you could work for an organisations such as the VSO, Peace Corps, Amnesty International, or in any career that requires an understanding of people and is involved with decision making.

 

Science - Combined Science and Triple Science

Exam Board:
Edexcel

Staff:
Miss S Knowles

GCSE Science Routes

What use would a GCSE Science qualification be after I leave school?

A GCSE Science qualification can prepare you for advanced level courses such as A/AS level in Biology, Chemistry and/or Physics. If you are thinking of further education and/or a career in Science then you should check what level is required for further study and training. Some qualifications and employers will specify whether they need you to have gained a GCSE in Core, Additional or Triple Science.

With further training, you could go into a job related to science such as: a Doctor of Medicine, Forensic Scientist, veterinary medicine, Microbiologist, Pharmacist, Materials Scientist and Geneticist. A GCSE Science qualification also demonstrates to employers and colleges that you grasp the key concepts of logically thinking, creative thinking and evaluation.


Combined Science

 

Introduction:

This course is developed to meet the diversity of students’ needs and aspirations. This will encourage you to be inspired, motivated and challenged by following a broad, coherent, practical, satisfying and worthwhile course of study. It provides insight into and experience of how science works, stimulating your curiosity and encouraging you to engage with science in everyday lives and to make informed preferences about further study and career preferences.

This course comprises of the 3 sciences which are assessed through 6 external exams at the end of your two year course.

What will I learn?

This course includes all areas of Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics) detailed below are the units covered in Combined Science in each specialism:

Biology
Biology draws on the Science taught in KS3 and looks at; Cells and control, Genetics, Natural Selection, Health and diseases, plants, homeostasis, coordination and eco-systems.

Chemistry
Adding to the topics already taught in KS3 the Chemistry module further develops on; States of matter, Atomic structure, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, acids and alkalis, chemistry calculations, electrolytic processes, rates of reactions, earth and atmospheric sciences.

Physics
The Physics module gets students to thinki about: Motion, forces, energy, waves, the Electromagnetic Spectrum, radioactivity, work, electricity and circuits, magnetism and induction.

Combined Science Assessment:

If studying Combined Science you will receive 2 GCSE grades at the end of the course. You will study all 3 areas of Science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and sit 2 exams in each, giving 6 exams in total at the end of Year 11. Each exam will last 70 minutes and will be scored out of 60 marks. The combination of the scores will be what dictates the final double grade.


Introduction

This course is designed for those who either have a love for Science or for those who want to study science to go into a career in science. The course compromises of three separate subjects which will be taught by three separate subject specialists in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. At the end of year 11 you will be assessed in 6 exams which will then give you 3 GCSE’s one for each subject.

What will I learn?

As well the topics outlined in Combined Science, which you may go into greater depth of, you will also study, amongst others, the following topics:

Biology:
Testing food; the brain; the eye; further DNA; further inheritance & variation; mutations; tissue culture; fertilisers & biological controls; pathogens; monoclonal antibodies; testing new medicines; plant defences.

Chemistry:
Bulk and surface properties of matter including nanoparticles; qualitative analysis; alcohols and carboxylic acids; transition metals, alloys and corrosion.

Physics:
Astronomy, static electricity, pressure and gases.

Triple Science Assessment:

If studying Triple Science you will receive 3 GCSE grades at the end of the course. You will study all 3 areas of Science (Biology, Chemistry and Physics) and sit 2 exams in each. Each set of 2 exams will be worth 1 GCSE e.g. 2 exams in Biology gives you a Biology GCSE grade, giving a total of 6 exams. An exam will last 1 hour and 45 minutes and is marked out of 100. Each exam is worth 50% towards a full GCSE.

Sociology

Exam Board:
AQA

Staff:
Miss L Walker

Introduction:

GCSE Sociology helps students to gain knowledge and understanding of key aspects of society and people’s behaviour. It will give you great insight into the world around you, both within the UK and abroad.

We examine issues through the study of families, education, crime and deviance and economic differences. Have you wondered why some people do better than others at school? Are opportunities equal to all people? Why do people get married …….. or divorced, and what effect this has on society? Have you considered why people turn to crime and whether this is inked to their educational achievement? What is the point of prisons? Why are some people poor?

You will develop your analytical, assimilation and communication skills by comparing and contrasting perspectives on a variety of social issues, constructing reasoned arguments, making judgements and drawing reasoned conclusions. There will be plenty of classroom debate involved.

By studying sociology, you will develop transferable skills including how to:

  • investigate facts and make deductions
  • develop opinions and new ideas on social issues
  • analyse and better understand the social world.
What will I learn?
  1. The sociological approach
  2. Social structures, social processes and social issues
  3. Families
  4. Education
  5. Crime and deviance
  6. Social stratification (how society is organised)
  7. Sociological research methods
Assessment:

Two exam papers, each lasting 1 hour 45 minutes

What use would this qualification be after I leave school?

Sociology is a highly regarded course that could lead to a variety of courses in higher education and many different careers. The course is an excellent basis for moving on to an AS/A Level as well as vocational subjects such as Health and Social Care It could also take you towards a number of careers, including working in the civil service, legal occupations, healthcare, medical fields, social work and teaching.

find out more

Head's Welcome

Head's Welcome

Click here to read more
Values & Ethos

Values & Ethos

Click to read more
Prospectus

Prospectus

Download our Prospectus
Teach At King Harold

Teach At King Harold

Join our Team